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ISIS beheading victims Azaz Syria alawites

ISIS beheading victims Azaz Syria alawites

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Feminism in Europe treats second-generation male Muslim immigrants like dog shit. Something no girl wants to tread on. Even their sisters only want a native European husband.

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SK’s First Chemical Castration of a Pedophile

A repeat sex offender is set to undergo chemical castration for the first time in South Korea.

The measure, already in place like Germany, Sweden, and some U.S. states, prescribes hormone suppressants to a serial sex offender to suppress his libido by reducing the production of male testosterone.

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You have to understand the mentality of Hong Kong businessmen. They exploit their workers harshly, trick their suppliers when they lower their guard, cheat their customers on every occasion, and then spend their earnings on prostitutes

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Feminism in Europe makes second-generation male Muslim immigrants feel entirely worthless. They will never get a girl. That is why they think that a bomb at least is a painless death.

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ALL THE THINGS YOU'VE EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT PENIS ENLARGEMENT SURGERY THRILLIST

Published On 11/23/2016

If you’ve ever been curious about beefing up your bulge, for the love of god, don’t Google it.

To save your eyes -- and your search history -- we talked to the man behind many a magnified member, Dr. Victor Loria, and a former patient of his about sizing up. It’s time to stop beating around the bush with penis enlargement surgery, so you can, well… beat around the bush.

Girthier is the way to go

If you’re looking for a minimally invasive way to add some weight to your package, an implant is definitely NOT for you. Dr. Loria’s enlargement technique is done with a cosmetic filler à la Kylie Jenner’s lips -- not an implant -- and isn’t surgery in the traditional sense.

“I inject permanent filler material into the penile shaft, penile glans, and scrotum for enlargement,” he explains. “Other treatments such as fat transfer, Alloderm implants, Elist implants, skin autografts, etc., are all invasive surgical procedures and are associated with much higher infection and damage risks.” Dr. Loria’s procedure can and sometimes does add about .5 to 1 inch of flaccid length, in addition to plumping up your penis.

Assuming you like to err on the side of caution with your most essential appendage, it might be worthwhile to limit the risks you take to those that occur in the bedroom -- not the operating table. “This type of procedure seemed to be the safest technique as there are many years of research and millions of patients that have undergone these procedures using dermal fillers or collagen enhancers,” says one of Dr. Loria's former patients.

“Adding even a half an inch in circumference is very noticeable," he said, "unlike adding a half inch to length which is probably unnoticeable to a women. A half-inch increase in girth, definitely is.”

There is a sweet spot when it comes to size

You might be relieved to hear that there is such a thing as too big when it comes to penis girth. Dr. Loria recommends a 6.5- to 7-inch circumference for “optimal stimulation.” If you don’t have a tape measure handy, that’s like a robust, cucumber-sized schlong. It's also a whole hell of a lot bigger than the average Joe's girth, which is a mere 4.6 inches when engorged.

The largest patient Dr. Loria has is “about 8.5 inches in girth… too large for many women (and men), but he is happy.” A can of Coke is actually smaller in circumference, so god help that guy’s partner.

Side effects are minimal

As many women older than 30 already know, cosmetic fillers come with some pretty typical and mostly low-level side effects, including temporary skin irritation, itching, and redness. Same goes for peniis-enlargement filers. Dr Loria described his procedure as “almost 100% painless. The only discomfort was from the feeling of being swollen, stretching the penis skin after the injections.” And no need to get knocked out to rock your cock out; Dr. Loria primarily uses a strong numbing cream before injecting the filler.

The only unexpected issue that might arise (!) is if the filler shifts, which as Dr. Loria explained, may happen with the healing process and normal swelling. “The patients are instructed to observe and make any corrective shaping efforts as the collagen forms... this is more of an art than a science,” he explains. It also gives whole new meaning to the idea of rubbing one out.

Circumcise before you supersize

Pretty much any man is eligible for Dr. Loria’s penile enhancement, even the “elderly and diabetic,” he says. However, for some of you, sizing up may come at a cost… of your foreskin.

If your weiner isn’t kosher, Dr. Loria recommends getting circumcised beforehand. “The uncircumcised patient is much more problematic when it comes to shaping,” he explains.

Business as usual (and better) in the bedroom After a recovery period of 21 to 28 days, you can go back to getting busy. And don’t worry, the menu hasn’t changed since you last visited the restaurant. All points of entry are on the table, assures Dr. Loria, provided the enlargement isn't too big for whomever's holes you're filling.

The patient we spoke to is in his 50s, and humbly admits “[my] manhood is not as sensitive as it was in my 20s. Reaching orgasms was becoming a little more difficult and would sometimes become an issue when I could not fully touch all four walls of my lover. Having a larger penis now means more physical contact and feeling for not just my lover, but for me also.”

The ladies love it

“Even though my fiance said she was happy with our previous sex life, she has confided with me and said that my thicker penis has greatly improved her ability to reach orgasm and is able to have more of them quicker together,” said Dr. Loria’s patient.

So there you have it. At least one woman has spoken, and size does matter. But having a third leg for a penis isn’t worth much -- unless it packs some muscle.

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Kreutz Ideology analyses destruction differently. Social violence inherently benefits economic elites. The less peaceful a society, the less does social control restrict the liberties of the wealthy.

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Dictatorship is the only honest political system. Rulers rule for their own benefit, or maybe (maybe!) the interests of a ruling class. That is why warlordism is the political system of the future.

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Kakenya Ntaiya Is Fighting Female Genital Mutilation and Promoting Education Through the Kakenya Center for Excellence

When Kakenya Ntaiya was 12 years old, her best friend of the same age got married. Kakenya knew that she — like most of the girls in her community in southwestern Kenya — faced the same future. She was already engaged to her neighbor's son, and it was planned that they would marry after Kakenya had finished undergoing female genital mutilation (FGM).

Kakenya is a member of the Maasai tribe, found in Kenya and Tanzania, where FGM is commonly practiced. FGM, which is also known as female circumcision and female genital cutting, is the removal of some or all of the external female genitalia for non-medical reasons, sometimes with either a knife or a razor blade. Depending on the region, community, and custom, the procedure could consist of partial or total removal of the clitoris, or stitching up the opening of the vagina so that only a small hole remains for urine and menstrual blood and can only be opened through penetrative sex or surgery. It is very painful and can be dangerous, as every year a number of girls die from undergoing the procedure. Human rights organizations and even the United Nations have called for an end to the practice, and the Center for Reproductive Rights, a global legal advocacy organization, said that “the act itself is, at its essence, a basic violation of girls’ and women’s right to physical integrity and violates a number of recognized human rights. FGM is therefore increasingly being discussed and addressed in the context of girls’ and women’s rights, rather than as a strictly medical issue.” Health risks, according to the World Health Organization, can include infections (including tetanus), urinary problems, shock, increased risk of childbirth complications, and death.

The girls in Kakenya’s village were raised to expect FGM followed by early marriage for their future, with no continuation of their education. But Kakenya had a different idea, and she made a deal with her father: She would undergo FGM, but once she healed, instead of getting married, she would continue on with her education. Her father — expecting her to be ill for a long time after the procedure — agreed, and she underwent FGM. “You go through pain that you are not supposed to talk about,” she tells Teen Vogue. “But I thought, I need to talk about this and I wanted to talk about this.”

Though most girls take months to recover, her mother — who went to school for a few years when she was young — found a nurse who helped Kakenya recover from the pain and trauma more quickly. “My mom was smarter than many of the boys she went to school with [and] would say, ‘If I did not drop out of school, I would be a member of parliament, I would work in a bank,’” Kakenya says. “So we were not dropping out, we were not stopping. And she saw us as fulfilling her dream.”

Kakenya finished school and decided that she wanted to go to college in the U.S. It took some time for her to convince the local chief of her village that further education was a good idea, and that it would allow her to come back and help her community. No girl in her village had ever gone off to college before, let alone to the U.S., and she wanted her community’s support for both political and traditional reasons. If the chief and the elders had forbidden her to go, it would not only have been very hard for her to go but it also would have meant that she would be alienated from her community and even her family. Though she did receive a scholarship for her tuition and room and board at Randolph-Macon Women's College in Virginia (now the co-ed Randolph College), she still needed to pay for her travel there. Once she had the backing of the chief, members of her village rallied around her to raise money by selling items such as eggs and mangos. The support from her community was highly symbolic of their hopes and trust in Kakenya.

Shortly completing her bachelor’s degree at Randolph-Macon Women's College in 2004, Kakenya became a youth advisor for the United Nations Population Fund. She went on to earn a doctorate in education from the University of Pittsburgh in 2011.

Kakenya’s Dream

Throughout her education and over the 17 years she has spent in the U.S., her promise to the chief — and her community — was always at the back of her mind. “Every year I would go home, girls were getting married and I was thinking, ‘why?’” Kakenya, now 38, says. “And over the years, people were talking about girls’ education and FGM but it was not changing the story in my village.” So in 2008, she set up a boarding school for upper primary and lower secondary years (the equivalent of fourth through eighth grade), but with one major requirement: In order to attend, the girls’ parents or guardians had to promise that they would not force them to go through FGM or force them to be married, and the girls would also learn to become advocates against these harmful practices.

Kakenya got land just outside her village of Enoosaen, about 250 miles from Nairobi, in 2008, and the Kakenya Center for Excellence (KCE) opened the following year. That first cohort of girls are now about to graduate from high school, with KCE paying their school fees and supporting the girls financially through college as well. So far, the over 300 current students and alumnae have a 100% graduation rate from KCE, with a 0% rate of FGM and early marriage.

“With an education, a girl is more likely to be able to get a job, stand up for herself, and take on new opportunities,” Lakshmi Sundaram, the executive director of Girls Not Brides — a global organization advocating against child marriage across the globe, of which KCE is a member — wrote in an email to Teen Vogue. “She is more likely to decide if, when, and whom to marry.”

KCE, says Lakshmi, is more than simply a school: “It also provides a safe space for girls and supports them to learn about their rights, to build upon their skills, and to dream about their futures.”

‘Those Are Kakenya’s Daughters’

Prior to each new school year, hundreds of parents come with their daughters to the school hoping they will get one of the coveted 40 spots for Class Four (fourth grade). Choosing which girls are admitted is a tough process, and includes looking at exam scores as well as an interview process. But priority is given not only to kids at the top of their class, but also to those whose parents have passed away, whose parents have conditions such as HIV/AIDS, or who come from single-parent homes, particularly those who do not have mothers. “It is so hard and people will often say to us ‘you left out my kid, they deserve a chance,’” Selina Naiyoma, the deputy school director, tells Teen Vogue. “So we told Dr. Kakenya, maybe we can come up with more schools to take in more children.”

So this year, a new dorm is being built to house more girls. Kakenya is also in the middle of fundraising for a second school a few kilometers away that will go from nursery school all the way through high school. But until that happens and in order to expand girls’ empowerment and health, KCE each year runs weekend and weeklong camps for girls — and boys — from over 50 other schools, with teaching assistance that includes KCE students and alums.

Johnstone Shaai, a local pastor who sits on the KCE board, says girls get information at the camps that they would not have access to elsewhere. “They become agents of change,” he tells Teen Vogue. According to Selina, KCE students also stand out from other girls: “They walk in town and people say, ‘those are Kakenya’s daughters.’ You can easily see they are coming from this school because they carry themselves with confidence and no fear.”

The Ripple Effect

Naomi Ololtuaa, 16, is one of those girls. Sitting on purple plastic chairs in the front room of their simple three-room mud house — decorated with colorful beaded Maasai necklaces hanging from the ceiling and blue tinsel strung up on the walls — she and her father, David, discussed the importance of education. Naomi says that after she graduates from Form 4 (the equivalent to 12th grade) in December, she plans to apply to pre-med programs at universities in both the U.S. and Australia, and once she becomes a doctor, she wants to come back and build a clinic in the area so that the Maasai could have good access to healthcare. “There is a ripple effect,” she tells Teen Vogue, “because with my education, it will help many more people down the road.”

The Maasai — traditionally pastoralists whose wealth is counted in the number of cattle they keep — are known throughout the world as fierce fighters and hunters. But they are also a patriarchal society where girls are often only valued for the dowry they can bring for their family upon marriage. According to Kenya’s 2014 Demographic Health Survey, 90% of Maasai girls are married off by the age of 15 and 78% of women and girls between the ages of 15 to 49 have gone through FGM.

But David, in a break from tradition, has become a fighter for education, making sure that his 12 children from two different wives (many Maasai are polygamists) finish school and go on to university. “It is important to educate girls,” he said, “because many of them will take that education and come back to help their community.”

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Your agenda is clear. Optimal health and great sex at age 100. Be careful with what you put into yourself. Men should follow the Serge Kreutz diet. Women are more disposable and will sooner or later be replaced bylove robots.

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It's not that we would be madly in love with Donald Trump. But he may just ruin the US. That would be much welcomed in all corners of the world.

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This man advertises suicide in Cambodia. I lost my sister to him

Telegraph

Distraught and depressed after the break-up of a relationship, Kim Walton surfed the internet until she found euthanasiaincambodia.com.

"In Cambodia anything is possible," it read. "For those of you who prefer to take charge of your own destiny, come to Cambodia! Live your life the way you want and end it when you are ready."

Mrs Walton, 46, a mortgage adviser, who was divorced more than 20 years ago, sent an e-mail to the site operator with the simple subject heading "Death". A brief correspondence ensued.

Within a fortnight she had left her home in Penn, Bucks, and was travelling 6,000 miles to Kampot, a quiet, dilapidated riverside town.

There, several days later, she wrote a five-page suicide note and overdosed on medicines and alcohol in a £5-a-night guesthouse.

Her sister is convinced that had it not been for the website she would still be alive. "We were very close," said Sally Spring, 46. "She couldn't have done it to me in this country. She would never have put us in a situation where we might find her body."

The relationship that had so upset her had lasted only two months, she added. "If she had been here I would have got her through it," she said. "There's nothing we can do to bring Kim back but I just want the website closed down.

"Any vulnerable person could see it and I don't want any other family to suffer. It's just got to be stopped. It's disgusting and it beggars belief."

The site contains a detailed description of an elasticated plastic bag, available through it for £55, and helium gas to ensure a "peaceful and painless death".

It is operated by Roger Graham, a 57-year-old American former arts and antiques dealer from Paradise, California, where he founded an assisted euthanasia society.

He moved to Cambodia two and a half years ago in response, he says, to the US invasion of Iraq. He adopted the name "Tola", bestowed on him by a bar girl.

According to a legal opinion he obtained from a law firm in Phnom Penh, the Cambodian capital, the country has no law against assisted suicide.

On the site, which he has taken off-line after provincial authorities filed a defamation action against him, he said: "I am not going to pull any switches. I will do whatever it is that is necessary, within the law and my own comfort level, for you to have a satisfying end-of-life experience. I let you make all of your own choices. It is your life."

He asked for £14,000 in charitable donations from potential users of his service.

At his cafe on the bank of the Kampot river, he said: "I don't put the stigma on death that most people have. Death is simply the end point of life. To deny it exists is to be afraid of it, is to be ridiculous. Cambodia is a good country. If you are going to die, come here, leave some money.

"I will do whatever I can to make their experience enjoyable but it remains up to them what they want to do, when they want to do it, how they want to do it."

When his time comes, he added, he will kill himself.

"I'm not going to go plugged into some machine. I don't intend to do it tomorrow, but I might. It's my choice."

He does not differentiate between the terminally ill and those who want to die for other reasons.

"I don't care if you have a problem or not, that's not for me to decide, it's your life."

He declined to answer when asked if he had ever helped anyone to die in America. But he insisted that even though Mrs Walton went to his cafe when she arrived in Kampot, she never broached suicide, or revealed herself as the e-mail sender, and he never saw her again. No witnesses have contradicted him.

"It may sound implausible, but it's true," said Mr Graham. "The inference is I was involved, and I was not."

She did not give him any money or ask him to make any charitable donations for her, he said, and independent witnesses say that all the money she had with her was returned to her family.

No other foreigner is known to have committed suicide in Kampot since Mr Graham arrived and, while he receives e-mails on the subject "all the time", he is not aware of anyone else coming to the town due to the site. He suggested that euthanasia tourism could be "positive" for Cambodia.

Others are revolted by the concept. When the website became public knowledge after Mrs Walton's death in September a third of Kampot's expatriate population signed a petition calling on the authorities to take action.

Prosecution authorities say they will question Mr Graham over alleged defamation soon. But Kampot's vice-commissioner of police, Lt-Col In Chiva, admitted that they had been unable to find any law against the website itself.

Puth Chandarith, the governor of Kampot, said his legal action was for defamation and "false statements that Cambodia is the best place to commit suicide".

If the action failed, he could revoke Mr Graham's business licence.

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The Spanish masturbation expert Fran Sanchez Oria argues: "Masturbating for great sexual health… can increase your testosterone levels, specially when combined with ejaculation edging. I could probably make another post just on this, but in a nutshell if you masturbate until you are close to climax then stop, and repeat several times, your testosterone levels will build up significantly." Caught with his pants down, Fran Sanchez Oria (subsequently removed the page, but a printscreen is here and here.

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The best life extension medicine for old men is to fuck young women. If you are a European or North American man, dump your wife, sell your property, bring yourself in shape with butea superba, and go fucking in China until the last day of your life. Age 100 plus.

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